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Check out this audio interview.  Take a listen here.

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A recent question folks have been asking aboutThe Lutheran Study Bible is, “How does this new Study Bible differ from the Concordia Self-Study Bible?” This is a very good question.

The doctrine of the Trinity provides a specific, helpful illustration of a difference between the two Study Bibles. The following are notes for the Old Testament reading on Trinity Sunday, which we just had in church.

CSSB note for Isaiah 6:3:
Holy, holy, holy. The repetition underscores God’s infinite holiness. Note the triple use of ‘the temple of the Lord’ in Jer 7:4 to stress the people’s confidence in the security of Jerusalem because of the presense of that sanctuary.”

TLSB note for Isaiah 6:3:
Holy, holy, holy. Refers to God in His totally separated state from humanity. In Hbr, repetition expresses a superlative; God is supremely holy. This threefold repetion is also evocative of the three persons of the Trinity. Ambr: “They say it, not once, lest you should believe that there is but one; not twice, lest you should exclude the Spirit; they say not holies, lest you should imagine that there is plurality, but they repeat three times and say the same word, that even in a hymn you may understand the distinction of Persons in the Trinity, and the oneness of the Godhead and while they say this they proclaim God” (NPNF 2 10:151).

The team that developed the NIV Study Bible, which is the basis of the Concordia Self-Study Bible, did not always prepare their notes with an editorial emphasis on creedal theology. Therefore, opportunities to reflect upon the triune nature of God were sometimes overlooked. The quotation from TLSB also shows how there are more notes in TLSB and how they include insights and commentary from Church Fathers (in this case, Ambrose of Milan, c. 339–97 AD).

Both Study Bibles provide helpful notes but there is a difference in emphasis and in the number of notes/insights. I’ll post a second example of how the difference in theological emphasis appears in the two Study Bibles.

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ESV_logo_LGFrom time to time, I hear from pastors and lay people asking, “Why did the Missouri Synod decide to go with the English Standard Version in its new hymnal resources and now across most of its published resources?”

It has been a number of years, nearly six to be exact, since the Missouri Synod’s Commission on Worship issued their recommendation to The LCMS that as part of the process of adopting a new hymnal, the English Standard Version Bible translation be the translation of choice for all worship materials in the Missouri Synod. And since the hymnal and all companion resources was adopted by the Synod convention with an overwhelmingly strong majority, since the Commission on Worship surveyed the entire Synod’s pastoral roster relentlessly beforehand, and kept everyone fully aware and informed of all decisions about this, and all matters related to the hymnal, and then, in light of the fact that now nearly 70% of all LCMS congregations are using Lutheran Service Book, with an amazingly high level of satisfaction, and low level of complaint, it is clear that the decision to go with the ESV has been very well received and well accepted. (more…)

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Study BibleFrom Paul McCain:

I have several things to update you on about The Lutheran Study Bible. Cover materials have been finalized and chosen for The Lutheran Study Bible. The regular hardback editions will be bound in the same burgundy materials as Lutheran Service Book Hymnal. The genuine and bonded leather materials have been chosen. The genuine leather will be a nice matte black and burgundy leather, which will take gold foil imprinting very nicely. The bonded will be offered in black and burgundy as well. We’ve settled on the size of the larger print edition. It is going to be about a 7.5 x 10 book, so we could get the type size noticeably larger than the regular print edition. We will be sending a good printed sample of the difference in type size so everyone can give it a good look and make their choice. Me? I’m going with the larger print edition. I suspect a *lot* will opt for the larger print. We will see. The final files of the whole Bible were sent to the printer on Friday, and all has cleared what we call “preflight” in which the printer takes the files and checks to make sure all is formatted correctly. The next step is for the printer to make the printer’s proof and return it to us. We should be on press and printing by the end of June. Signature sewing and bind up, then binding, will take a number of more weeks. The regular and larger print editions are being printed in two different facilities. The large promotional kit will be mailed out toward the end of July which will contain a whole host of helps and aids to help Lutheran congregations promote the Bible and receive orders for it. The pre-publication prices are in effect through October 31, but it will be wise to gather and send in orders as quickly as possible. Deliveries of Bibles will be first come, first served. From the volume of questions and interest and pre-orders we are receiving, we anticipate a very large response and many orders and are trying to anticipate that with our first print run. But once we run out of the first print run, we are out again for up to twelve weeks due to paper supply and manufacturing schedules, so….word to the wise, don’t hesitate to get your order in. The promotional mailing is going out to all Lutheran congregations in the USA, over 20,000. Remember: your best source of information on the new Bible is http://www.cph.org/lutheranbible You may view samples there. And be sure to tell others about this Facebook Group and invite them to join. Don’t forget the Twitter feed, daily notes from The Lutheran Study Bible: http://www.twitter.com/lutheranbible

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This is from one of my favorite blog sites called cyberbrethren.  I get questions like this from time to time and thought this would answer a lot of questions.

From time to time, I hear from pastors and lay people asking, “Why did the Missouri Synod decide to go with the English Standard Version in its new hymnal resources and now across most of its published resources?”

It has been a number of years, nearly six to be exact, since the Missouri Synod’s Commission on Worship issued their recommendation to The LCMS that as part of the process of adopting a new hymnal, the English Standard Version Bible translation be the translation of choice for all worship materials in the Missouri Synod. And since the hymnal and all companion resources was adopted by the Synod convention with an overwhelmingly strong majority, since the Commission on Worship surveyed the entire Synod’s pastoral roster relentlessly beforehand, and kept everyone fully aware and informed of all decisions about this, and all matters related to the hymnal, and then, in light of the fact that now nearly 70% of all LCMS congregations are using Lutheran Service Book, with an amazingly high level of satisfaction, and low level of complaint, it is clear that the decision to go with the ESV has been very well received and well accepted. (more…)

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homebkgrd_03-300x224We began this project first with an extensive and wide reading/research project, by which we invited lay people to read parts of the Bible assigned to them and write down every single question they had as they read the Bible. We had nearly 500 people reading the Scriptures in this very intentional way. This project produced a large data base of questions and comments which guided all we did in preparing this Bible. We asked professors from our seminaries to provide us with the most recent scholarship on all the books of the Bible, with issues identified clearly and then we turned to a team of note writers, the great majority of whom are active parish pastors, to write and help edit the notes. The result is a Bible that is scholarly, pastoral, practical, devotional and faithful to God’s Word, and clearly presented for the lay reader in view, with a keen focus on the Christ-centered nature of Scripture in the paradigm of Law/Gospel, which is that “particularly brilliant light” for proper understanding of the Bible, as our Lutheran Confessions put it. I’ll give you a list of the “priorities” we had in view as we did this Bible, as a PS at the end of this note.

Simply put, in the history of our Synod, there has not been a study Bible like this one produced for English speaking Lutherans. We have created this Bible with research, notes and commentary produced, “from the ground up” from Lutheran sources, scholars, pastors and writers. Previously we have borrowed notes from other non-Lutheran publishers and modified them for use in our church. I guess the situation is comparable to making a meal from scratch, with your own ingredients, and buying something pre-made and slightly changing it.

When describing The Lutheran Study Bible project to the CPH Board of Directors, to CPH staff, and to potential contributors, we included six goals for the work. We sought to create a study Bible that does the following:

1. Presents justification by grace alone, through faith alone, in Christ alone, as the chief teaching of Scripture (Lk 24:44-;47; Jn 5:39; SA II I 1-4)
2. Properly distinguishes and applies Law and Gospel (reading the Bible as a book about justification;Jn 1:17Gal 3:21-22; Ap XIIA 53-54)
3. Emphasizes God’s work through the means of grace (Mt 26:26-29Jn 3:520:22-23Rm 10:17; SA III IV)
4. Functions from a “Scripture alone” point of view and presents a “Scripture interprets Scripture” approach to using the Bible (Ps 119; 1Tm 6:3; 2Tm 3:16-17; FC Ep Sum)
5. Equips the laity for works of service, with a particular focus on evangelism in their various vocations/callings in life (Ps 145:4–13; Eph 2; Ap XV 41-42)
6. Presents a uniquely Lutheran study Bible that features genuinely Lutheran notes and comments throughout, references to the Lutheran Confessions where appropriate, focus on the Small Catechism for helps and explanations, citations from Luther throughout, and materials to aid daily devotion and prayer

TLSB will be out by this October. I would invite you to look around the following web sites for a lot more information and samples of the Bible: http://www.cph.org/lutheranbible You will find at this web site pre-publication pricing information.

In the next couple of weeks we are mailing to every Lutheran congregation across the United States and Canada a forty-eight page “sampler” of TLSB. I hope you get a chance to see it. If you don’t, you can download a copy of it from the Internet. It is a large file (13 megabytes), so it will take a few minutes to download to your computer. When you click this link, the download will begin: <http://www.cph.org/cphstore/pages/resources/tlsb/tlsb%20sampler_body.pdf> Our congregations should have this mailing by the end of May, if not earlier. We will follow up this mailing later in the summer with a larger set of promotional materials for our congregations to use to gather orders. We are also featuring this Bible at our district convention displays, so be sure to stop by our booth.

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